Permission to Let Go: Lessons from The Concorde Fallacy

About two *cough* decades ago, I conducted my Ph.D research on parental behavior, using a bird species as my model system. In the biological sciences, it's common practice to use research models to ask questions that then might be applicable to other species -- perhaps even applicable to... people *gasp*. Through my background research, I discovered that there are actually … Continue reading Permission to Let Go: Lessons from The Concorde Fallacy

Deathwatch, David Lee Roth and the Roundness of Hamburgers

Over the past few months, as I've been working on a challenging new writing project, I've found myself thinking about my grandmother. Grandmother Olive (my mom's mom) was the kind of lady people refer to as "a character." She had some weird mannerisms and beliefs. My mom always laughs when she tells about her own mother's … Continue reading Deathwatch, David Lee Roth and the Roundness of Hamburgers

10 First-Timer’s Writing Conference Tips, Written By A First-Timer

This weekend, I had the amazing opportunity to attend the LDS Storymakers conference for the first time ever.* In fact, not only was this my first time at Storymakers, it was my first time at any major writing conference. For those of you who, like me, are thinking of attending your first writing conference, I’d … Continue reading 10 First-Timer’s Writing Conference Tips, Written By A First-Timer

On Writing About Sensitive (Trigger) Topics

Trigger warning: This post mentions potential trigger topics. I love writing happily-ever-afters (HEAs) for my characters, but in order for them to get there, they have to go through quite a lot. The following quote from one of my favorite reviews summarizes this nicely: My stories always include hard and stormy issues (This post explains why it helps to … Continue reading On Writing About Sensitive (Trigger) Topics

The World is Wide Enough: Rethinking the “-er” and the “-est”

  We are all storytellers here, and today's post is about my most recent experiences with one specific form of storytelling: live theater. Due to ridiculous good fortune and a particularly skilled friend, I found myself in possession of a (reasonably priced!) ticket to see one of the very first performances of Hamilton in San … Continue reading The World is Wide Enough: Rethinking the “-er” and the “-est”